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12 gauge sledge hammer

A sledge hammer in the van or in the yard will evoke little suspicion. Flip the handle around, swap the shell from one end to the other and with these example you have a fully functioning 12 gauge shotgun.

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Improvised slam shotgun (Brazil)

A homemade 12 gauge slam type shotgun with the addition of a captive ‘pump’ barrel and loading window cut into the outer pipe.

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Improvised pipe shotgun

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DIY break barrel shotgun pistol project

“Another nice project based on the plans of Professor Parabellum. In the short “Combat” variant and embellished with a few accessories ;)”

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Never enough barrels.

Earlier this year police in Medina Minas Gerais received a call that a man was firing firearms on a public highway. Upon arriving at the scene police encountered a 52 year old man with a shotgun and after searching his house discovered four more homemade firearms. This quad barrel favela sweeper definitely takes pride of place.

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12 gauge plumbing pipe shotgun

Confiscated by police from a 77 year old man in Poland.

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Personal protection pole / steering wheel lock in attractive fire hydrant-red.

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EDC – Brazilian favella edition

April 14, 2018

Jamaican-made Street Sweeper

#JustIn: Police seized a sub-machine gun, a homemade firearm and 5 shotgun cartridges in Lilliput, St. James. More details soon. – Jamaica Constabulary

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By Any Means Necessary

This six shot improvised 12 gauge shotgun, which is incomplete, was seized by police along with Satan’s Plants by police in Brazil. On this crude example the drum is formed from multiple steel tubes welded together with a thumb screw below which is tightened to align and lock each chamber. The firing mechanism is missing.

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Improvised 12 gauge shotgun pistols

Typical criminally made weapons seized in Brazil.

Posts about pipe shotgun written by ImproGuns

Building a Pipe Shotgun with the Pop-A 410 DIY Kit

Make Your Pipe Dreams Come True with this Legal Do-It-Yourself Survival Shotgun Kit

Written by Mike Searson on April 22, 2020

In This Article

  • Building a Pipe Shotgun
  • Firing the Pop-A 410 Pipe Shotgun
  • Alternative Weapons
  • Closing Thoughts

Disclaimer: It’s legal for you to build your own firearms. Convicted felons or other prohibited persons, however, cannot. There may also be other applicable laws where you live, so double check the regulations in your jurisdiction. CMG West, its parent entities, and subsidiaries shall be held harmless in the event any entity acts on information provided in this article.

In the past few years, a “do-it-yourself shotgun” kit has become popular, billed as a survival gun. It’s made by Runway Sub-Cal, a manufacturer known for producing rifled flare gun inserts to allow shooters to fire pistol rounds through 26.5mm flare guns. Essentially, they provide a barrel, firing pin, and an outer barrel sleeve; the rest of the pipe shotgun is built from steel pipe fittings. I was a bit hesitant going into this assignment, but read on and see why it’s important for a number of reasons.

Building a Pipe Shotgun

Several retailers carry this kit. We ordered ours from Bud-K for $130 with free shipping.

The pipe shotgun package arrived via FedEx Smart Solutions, meaning that FedEx did all the heavy lifting getting it to within 20 miles of me and transferring final delivery to my local post office. Bud-K packaged it well enough, but after opening it up I realized there was no instruction sheet.

This wasn’t a big deal, as the kit is straightforward with a video on the company’s website. When compiling the items needed to finish it up, I went to double check on the website what a “jam nipple” was and realized the firing pin wasn’t included in the shipment.

Bud-K’s customer service desk began looking for extras in their warehouse. If they were unsuccessful, they’d have me return the kit in exchange for a new one. A few days later, they advised that the manufacturer would ship out the missing components directly. After about a week, it arrived.

Completion of the kit requires the following ½-inch pipe parts:

  • one ½-inch tee
  • three ½-inch caps
  • two 4-inch nipples
  • one 3-inch nipple
  • two 45-degree elbows
  • one 90-degree elbow
  • two jam nipples
  • one 5-inch nipple

The only parts that were somewhat difficult to find were the so-called jam nipples. These are short nipples that are completely threaded. I found them under a variety of names such as zero nipples and flush nipples. Perhaps jam nipples are a colloquialism in certain parts of the country or an older plumbing term, but I couldn’t find them under that name in stores near me.
After a quick trip to Home Depot and $32 later, I had everything I needed to put the Pop-A 410 together.

Assembly took about 15 minutes, if that long. One of the trickier things to get right was ensuring that the angled pipe connectors aligned properly. They might line up perfectly while only grasping two or three threads, but then would be totally out of alignment when tightened all the way down. Lucas Oil Gun Grease and a small pipe wrench in conjunction with a vise got everything properly into position. I threaded as far as I could, backed off, and repeated in order to grasp more threads to make it sturdy and straight.

Once you have an idea on how everything lines up, you can make it semi-permanent by using plumbers’ tape, Loctite, or another adhesive. Some builders have used JB Weld for a more permanent fix, but that might be excessive.

A crucial piece of this assembly is the ½-inch tee piece. This acts as your receiver, for lack of a better term, and the firing pin should be able to pass completely through it.

Above: For less than $35 in pipe fittings, you can complete the Pop-A 410 kit and have a single-shot shotgun.

When finished, you have basically a two-piece pipe shotgun composed of a chambered, spring-loaded barrel, a homemade receiver containing a fixed firing pin, a homemade stock, and pistol grips. A “safety” is included in the form of a clip that inserts between the firing pin and primer, attached to a short piece of cord so you don’t lose it. There’s no sighting system, but the forward pistol grip has a Weaver-style base so you can mount a red dot or visible laser. A short sheetmetal screw with a rounded head could make for an improvised bead sight.

You can leave the Pop-A 410 unfinished, “in the white,” or you can break out some Krylon, Duracoat, or even Cerakote if you feel fancy and coat it in a protective finish.

Runway Sub-Cal Pop-A 410 Specifications

Caliber(s)
.410 gauge

Barrel Length(s)
18 inches

OAL
28 inches

Weight (Unloaded)
3.9 pounds

Any prepared individual should have low-cost firearms on hand in the event of a long-term disaster. The Pop-A 410 pipe shotgun kit from Runway Sub-Cal requires just $35 in parts.