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  • Home
  • 421 Store
  • Blog
    • Cannabis as a Medicine
    • Cannabis Effects
    • Lifestyle
    • Cafe & Bakery
    • CannaAcademy
    • Interview with a Cannapreneur
    • Dry Herb Vaping Guide
    • Benefits Of Vaping Weed
    • How to Choose Your First Vaporizer
    • Vaporizer high vs. Smoking high
    • Conduction vs. Convection
    • Portable vs. Desktop Vaporizer
    • Wax vs. Dry Herb Vaporizers: What’s better?
    • How to Use a Dry Herb Vaporizer
    • Indoors Growing Guide
    • 5 Reasons to Grow Your Weed
    • A Step by Step Guide
    • Step One: Build An Indoor Grow Room
    • Step Two: Germinating The Seeds
    • Step three: The Vegetative Stage
    • Step Four: Flowering Stage
    • Step Five: Harvesting and Drying
    • Step Six: How to Trim Your Marijuana Bud
    • Auto-Flowering vs Feminized Seeds
    • Hydroponic Cannabis Growing Made Easy

    What is microdosing? How to lower weed tolerance without a t-break

    What is Microdosing?

    As Cannabis consumption is becoming mainstream, many stoners are taking different approaches for their cannabis lifestyle, as opposed to their high school times. They are focusing on wellness, rather being impaired.

    Many of them started to see the advantages of microdosing weed and how it allows them to go about their day, be productive, and operate normally. Still high, but the type of high is just enough to help them overcome the relief they’re seeking.

    Microdosing is basically consuming just the right amount of weed without getting “too high,” which can be different from a person to another. Just enough to maintain your high throughout your day without pushing your tolerance.

    If you get too baked then you did it wrong.

    Why Microdosing?

      1. Wellness, not impairment: People use Cannabis for different purposes. For Recreational purposes , which is mainly to get baked, have munchies, watch a movie, or even having sex, and it’s indeed an experience enhancer. On the other hand, many other marijuana users, especially after legalization, consume the herb for the medicinal purposes , to relieve a physical pain or overcome their anxiety and focus more on the benefits rather the impairment that may come with being overly baked.
      2. Minimum time for t-breaks: As much as I enjoy getting high, I don’t want to be high all day. Not because I don’t like it, but because it’ll make my tolerance sky high (no pun intended) in only few months and then I have to take a month or so t-break. And I really don’t want to do that. It also can get a bit expensive. More about it below.
      3. Stay productive ( read more about marijuana and productivity here )
      4. You will save lots of money.
      5. Preventing panic/anxiety attacks ( read more about marijuana and anxiety here ). Also microdosing can be effective for suppressing pain. The dose vs. response curve for cannabis is bimodal (involving two modes, two maxima). Microdosing targets the lower mode to avoid the high associated with larger dosages. Which can be beneficial for some, however not that much for others. You will have to try it out and judge by yourself.
      6. Finally, a more fulfilled life!

    How to lower weed tolerance without break?

    The 9 Tips to control your cannabis tolerance and enhance your high

    Let’s not abuse the herb. I enjoy smoking weed everyday, it makes my life better in every sense (and makes people around me a lot more tolerable). I’ve been successfully able to control my tolerance using those 9 tips. In one year, I went from smoking one gram a day, to one gram a week . It’s cheaper, helps me to stay productive, focused and positive, and I still enjoy it on daily bases.

    It’s all about that discipline. I started the process to fight my high tolerance by lowering my weekly consumption last week, specifically on weekdays. I don’t take my first hit till 730 pm. And that’s it for the evening, the weekends however, I don’t start smoking till after 2 or 3 pm.

    After taking my first t-break, I told myself never again! So I started looking to lower weed tolerance without quitting. I took different further steps to make sure not to take another t-break in my life again, and so far so good. Here are my suggestions of how to lower your weed tolerance without quitting:

    1. Be mindful about why, when, and how much you smoke: Choose the right occasions where you need to smoke weed. Pay attention to your daily dose control, find the minimal amount you actually “need” as opposed to what you “want” and stick to it. I consider myself a recreational user more than medical (I still smoke weed for social anxiety and depression, though), my high dose days usually over the weekend when I hang out with people. On weekdays however, I just drop crumbs into the vape machine once every evening and vape it. THe upside is, I never take a tolerance break; the downside is, I can’t get hammered as much as I like.

    2. Track your consumption religiously: How much you’re consuming a day and how long it takes till the high wears off and feel like taking another hit. Sometimes, though, it’s hard to track how much you consume when you were sharing your weed with other people.

    3. Setting boundaries: Don’t consume all day long. Get a full time job that you really enjoy sober, and not the type where you need to be stoned to go through it, otherwise, you’d be consuming much more, like I do on the weekends.

    4. Use distraction: To distract yourself from the need to consume, dedicate at least one hour a day of exercising time. To be completely honest, I used to workout high on daily bases, and I loved it (check my 4 Reasons Why I Exercise While I’m High ). I still do it occasionally, but I realized that I don’t really need to be high while exercise, according to many studies, researchers found that our body already stores THC in fat, and when you exercise, the body tend to produce this small amount of cannabinoids.

    Many stoners claim that their tolerance has not gone up as quickly due to their intense and regular workout schedule while drinking as much water as possible. This is because the THC is stored in your body fat and removing as much of that as possible can lead to a better high. These are only claims.

    5. Cycle Strains: Change it up regularly. Trick your body by mixing up strains; Indica, sativa, high THC, high CBD, etc. It’s a lot easier if you were living in astate where this is permitted because you can buy small quantities and it’s always available to get more when needed. Usually I buy one gram at a time, and always a different stain than the one before.

    6. Pace yourself: Don’t smoke a whole joint at once, instead, blaze mini joints throughout the day, or hit the vape once or twice (depends on your tolerance), wait for few minutes to assess your high before you hit it again. Most of the time, you overestimate how much is required to stone you. Often we over medicate. .

    7. Use different methods of consumption: I usually try to stay away from the old traditional way of smoking weed, like bongs and bowls. Instead, I used a vaporizer, which I encourage you to try. It gives you a cleaner high without all the toxins from combustion (check my blog piece Vaporizer high vs. Smoking high ), also you will have full control on the temperature which will also help your tolerance. Try smoking oil every once in a while, edibles, tinctures in drinks, baking, rosin chips, cooking, etc.

    8. Meditate: Meditation may decrease your desire to habitually get high. It helps to concentrate and teaches you to live the moment. In case you decided to meditate while high, it also very helpful for your tolerance. It can enhance your high without the need to take another hit. The best type of meditation for this purpose is the breathing technique, which is basically will teach you how to breathe to maximize oxygen intake. Start filling your lungs from the bottom, fill your lungs to 100% capacity, hold for around 3 seconds, then slowly exhale. You can do it as long as you want.

    9. Finally, Mango! We all have heard many myths about different methods stoners can use to lower their tolerance level and improve their high without taking a t-break.

    Based on my personal observation, the only way that works for me so far is eating mango . Eat a mango (or two) 45 minutes before you smoke. Eating mangos could help especially if you don’t have much myrcene in your diet. Myrcene is a terpene that is believed to help the THC to interact with the Cannabinoid receptors in your brain faster, but I haven’t found into any scientific studies prove that nor otherwise. All this is based on my and other stoners’ personal experience .

    There’s only one proven scientific method ; consuming more Omega-3. The online magazine, Civilized , has reported that researchers found that a lack of Omega-3 fats in a person’s body lowers the medical effects of cannabis. Without Omega-3 fats, the receptors in a person’s brain that absorb the compounds ( cannabinoids such as THC and CBD ) in cannabis won’t function properly, therefore, a person won’t receive the full effects from marijuana.

    Although American diet is not high on Omega-3 (mainly Omega-6 fat),you can still get Omega-3 from many sources such as fish oil, flax seeds, ground up hemp seeds and more . Even if you weren’t a Cannabis user and you don’t care about your marijuana tolerance, which you probably not, increasing your Omega-3 intake is still a great idea to improve overall brain health .

    Conclusion: don’t abuse the herb

    If you enjoy smoking weed and you don’t want to quit, why would you abuse it and pin it on your “medical condition.” It’s like enjoying a vegeburger, and you decided to have it three times a day, 7 days a week, because you have to eat 3 meals a day and you just can’t resist a vegeburger.

    Here are my rules of thumb:

    If you haven’t already abused the herb, then:

    • You’re not high all day long,.
    • Weed doesn’t justify your shortcoming in social, intimate or professional life.
    • You don’t feel that you can’t “tolerate” your life sober.
    • You feel that you still get high when you smoke weed.

    Stay toasty my friend s.

    Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in May 2018 and has been revamped and updated as needed for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

    1 Response
    Daniel Lebenstein

    December 08, 2018

    I have cancer and am trying to figure out how much and what strains to use and after reading your site am questioning my alternative treatment. I smoke, I vape, I use oils and eat edibles now with the excuse of using it medically. According to the article and my own observations (having smoked for 50 years) i (and the people close to me I am over medicating. I don’t feel particularly stoned and have over the years (especially these days) been having trouble with memory, keeping my train of thought, and coming up with words every day.
    My brother came up with a diagnosis (for our now passed away mom) for her dementia) which he called CRS (Can’t Remember Shit).
    I clearly have it and blame it on being a pothead and what the nurses call ‘chemohead’ . All 3 oncologists and and the many natural healers acknowledge and have encouraged me to consume and increase my use of CBD and THC. However they urge me not to smoke or vape. They all have urged me to urge me to use edibles which I enjoy to a certain degree but have noticed that I don’t get high like I used to. I still smoke but not a lot but rarely feel high.
    When I went through a shocking (at least for me) separation I became suicidal after she told me she was leaving me- I went to see a Harvard educated psychiatrist who told me that he wouldn’t treat me unless I stopped smoking it) he wouldn’t treat me. I agreed and noticed that I was feeling better after abstaining. After about 6 weeks I tried it again and cried like a baby. Two weeks after a quick divorce Hurricane Sandy took my home and I was in a FEMA motel for 4 months.
    He felt that it (and alcohol although I was never a drinker) are depressants. I Agreed and did stop I and began to feeling better. We increased meds and discontinued meds that I had taken for years for my early in life bi polar episodes. My mom and members of my maternal side) had previously been diagnosed as ‘manic depressants” and I was diagnosed years before as a young man as one.
    As Dr. George Bush’s (LOL!) urging stopped taking Depacote (My most recently prescription at the time) med for it. He felt that I was either misdiagnosed or was no longer bi polar after seeing me and talking to my internist) . I retired early and quickly and gratefully moved to Asheville. About a year and a half later I was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma- a terminal cancer.
    I have noticed that as I use it more and more medicinally I don’t even notice when I do smoke.
    It has become part of my culture as a Rasta/ Hippy.
    My question is- do I stop using it medicinally (I have no idea if it’s helping me) or continue or microdose with it as you suggest? I have already been microdosing with mushrooms which I believe has helped me- at least with depression? Now that I have relapsed again for only 18 months after a stem cell transplant I’m also wondering if I should discontinue when not having any awareness (after much reading) of dosages.
    I appreciate your taking the time and effort to share your knowledge about this subject.
    I hope my letter verifiies your beliefs is used to help others as well as myself.
    I found your site btw after reading a comment on a FB group from a woman with a link to your website.
    Thank you again for your insight and your sharing your knowledge.
    All my best to you!
    Daniel Lebenstein

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    As Cannabis consumption is becoming mainstream, many stoners are taking different approaches for their cannabis lifestyle, as opposed to their high school times. They are focusing on wellness, rather being impaired. Many of them started to see the advantages of microdosing weed and how it allows them to go about their

    How to Reset Your Cannabis Tolerance

    Feel like cannabis isn’t working for you the way it used to? You might be dealing with a high tolerance.

    Tolerance refers to your body’s process of getting used to cannabis, which can result in weaker effects.

    In other words, you need to ingest more to get the same effects you once did. This can be particularly problematic if you’re using cannabis for medical reasons.

    Fortunately, it’s pretty easy to reset your tolerance.

    Cannabis tolerance develops when you use it regularly.

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive compound in cannabis. It works by affecting the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors in the brain.

    If you ingest THC often, your CB1 receptors are reduced over time. This means the same amount of THC won’t affect the CB1 receptors in the same way, resulting in reduced effects.

    There’s no strict timeline for how tolerance develops. It depends on a range of factors, including:

    • how often you use cannabis
    • how strong the cannabis is
    • your personal biology

    One of the most common ways to lower your cannabis tolerance is to take a break from using cannabis. These are often called “T breaks.”

    Research shows that, while THC can deplete your CB1 receptors, they can recover over time and return to their previous levels.

    The length of your T break is up to you. There’s no solid data on exactly how long it takes for CB1 receptors to recover, so you’ll have to experiment a bit.

    Some people find that a few days does the trick. Most online forums advise that 2 weeks is the ideal time frame.

    If you’re using cannabis for medical reasons, taking a T break might not be feasible. There are a few other strategies you can try.

    Use cannabis products with a higher CBD-to-THC ratio

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is another chemical found in cannabis. It doesn’t seem to lead to depletion of CB1 receptors, meaning it doesn’t cause you to develop tolerance the way THC does.

    CBD won’t give you a “high,” but it does seem to have several potential health benefits, such as reducing pain and inflammation.

    At many dispensaries, you can find products ranging from a 1-to-1 ratio to as high as 16-to-1.

    Tightly control your doses

    The less cannabis you use, the less likely you are to develop a tolerance. Use the minimum you need to feel comfortable, and try not to overindulge.

    Use cannabis less often

    If possible, use cannabis less frequently. This can help to both reset your tolerance and prevent it from coming back again in the future.

    Many people who have developed a high tolerance do go through cannabis withdrawal when taking a T break or using less cannabis than usual.

    Cannabis withdrawal isn’t necessarily as intense as withdrawal from alcohol or other substances, but it can still be quite uncomfortable.

    You might experience:

    • mood swings
    • fatigue
    • headaches
    • cognitive impairment
    • diminished appetite
    • stomach problems, including nausea
    • insomnia
    • intense, vivid dreams

    To help with these symptoms, make sure to get plenty of hydration and rest. You can also try using over-the-counter medications to deal with headaches and nausea.

    Exercise and fresh air can help you feel alert and reduce any slumps in your mood.

    The withdrawal symptoms might make it tempting to continue using cannabis. To keep yourself accountable, tell your loved ones that you’re taking a break.

    While the symptoms are uncomfortable, the good news is that cannabis withdrawal symptoms usually only last for 72 hours.

    Once you’ve reset your tolerance, keep the following in mind to keep your tolerance in check moving forward:

    • Use lower-THC products. Since it’s THC that leads to the depletion of your CB1 receptors, it’s wise to opt for products that are a bit lower in THC.
    • Don’t use cannabis too often. The more you use it, the higher your tolerance will be, so try to only use it occasionally or as needed.
    • Use a lower dosage. Try consuming less cannabis at a time, and try to wait a bit longer before re-dosing.
    • Use CBD instead. You may want to consider giving CBD-only products a try if you’re looking to reap the potential health benefits of cannabis. However, THC does have some benefits that CBD doesn’t seem to have, so this switch isn’t viable for everyone.

    Keep in mind that tolerance might be unavoidable for some folks. If you find that you’re prone to developing a high tolerance, consider coming up with a plan to take regular T breaks as needed.

    It’s pretty normal to develop a tolerance to cannabis if you use it often. In most cases, taking a T break for a week or two will reset your tolerance.

    If that’s not an option, consider switching to products that are lower in THC or reducing your cannabis consumption.

    Keep in mind that cannabis tolerance can sometimes be a sign of cannabis use disorder. If you’re concerned about your cannabis use, you have options:

    • Have an open and honest conversation with your healthcare provider.
    • Call SAMHSA’s national helpline at 800-662-HELP (4357), or use their online treatment locater.
    • Find a support group through the Support Group Project.

    Sian Ferguson is a freelance writer and editor based in Cape Town, South Africa. Her writing covers issues relating to social justice, cannabis, and health. You can reach out to her on Twitter.

    If you've been consuming weed for a while, you've probably developed a high tolerance along the way. Here's how to reset it and keep it from happening again.