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Weed-Infused Gum and 5 Other Surprising Marijuana-Based Items to Help with Chronic Pain

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Not too long ago, I decided that I wanted to give some medicinal marijuana products a try. I have stage IV endometriosis. This can contribute to chronic pain throughout the month, especially when I’m on my period.

But I hate taking the narcotics my doctors prescribed me. I want to believe there’s a better way. So, I’ve been looking into it.

Of course, one of the top hits is marijuana for chronic pain. Though there isn’t any research yet that conclusively proves marijuana is an effective medication, there are some findings that suggest it has positive results for chronic pain.

The thing is — I hate smoking, and I don’t enjoy being high. So, I’ve been looking into what else is out there. I know about CBD oil and CBD pills, but I realized there are a lot of other cool medicinal marijuana products that I’d never heard of.

These are perfect for those people, like me, who want the benefits of cannabis without having to smoke, which can damage their lungs. It also means they won’t have to get high or take narcotics.

PlusGum promises a high for under five calories that takes effect within 15 minutes and lasts for four hours. The spearmint 6-pack provides 150 milligrams of THC, with 25 milligrams per piece of gum. But they aren’t the only gum product on the market. CanChew gum brings a high CBD-strain to the table that promises all the benefits without the high — something that a lot of people using medicinal marijuana are searching for. And MedChewRx is currently in clinical trials to use for chronic pain and spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis.

Because my periods bring on a heightened level of pain, I was especially curious about the weed-infused tampons I’d been hearing so much about. So, imagine my surprise when I discovered they aren’t actually tampons, but rather suppositories to be inserted vaginally when a woman is on her period. Foria Relief is the brand behind the product, and if you believe their online reviews, they seem to actually help.

A recently released study found that sipping your marijuana might be an effective way of dealing with chronic pain. Cannabis-infused tea is something you can actually make yourself, and it’s thought to be a method that provides slow-acting but long-lasting administration. Brands like Santé also have hemp tea ready for purchase.

To be clear, we’re talking about actual bath salts here — not the dangerous street drug you may have heard about. Whoopi & Maya have an Epsom Salt bath soak, which is meant to help combine the pain relief of medicinal marijuana with warm water, and according to their testimonials, it’s pretty potent.

If you’re looking to start your day with an extra special pick-me-up, these cannabis coffee pods may be right up your alley. They were just recently released and are said to be compatible with all Keurig coffee brewers. The pods come in different dosing strengths and strains, and can be caffeinated or decaffeinated. They also make tea and cocoa pods, and list new flavors coming soon. Not a fan of the plastic waste? They aren’t either. Their pods are 100% compostable for environmental health.

Medicated topical balms work by combining cannabis with other skin-soothing ingredients, which is rubbed into your skin to help relieve muscle pain. Leif Goods has balms that are available in cedar wood and orange, or lavender and bergamot. They use a mix of conditioning ingredients and cannabis extract to soothe both dry skin and muscle aches. Added plus: They’re bee-free and completely vegan!

What’s the downside of these products? Well, unless you live in a state with medicinal marijuana dispensaries and have a card to purchase, you may not be able to get your hands on them any time soon.

Even living in Alaska, where marijuana is 100 percent legal, I haven’t been able to find anything on this list. That’s because in Alaska we have plenty of regular marijuana dispensaries, but none for medicinal marijuana.

For the time being, states like Washington, California, and Colorado are likely your best bets for finding some of the more unique medicinal marijuana products you may hope to get your hands on. But until federal law catches up with the states willingness to decriminalize marijuana use, you won’t be able to travel across state lines with any product containing THC.

So, what have I done? Well, for the time being I’m experimenting with CBD oil — a product low enough in THC that it can actually be ordered and shipped online. But I’m visiting some friends in Washington next month, and you’d better believe I already have a list of products I’m hoping to give a try!

Leah Campbell is a writer and editor living in Anchorage, Alaska. A single mother by choice after a serendipitous series of events led to the adoption of her daughter, Leah’s also author of the book “ Single Infertile Female” and has written extensively on the topics of infertility, adoption, and parenting. You can connect with Leah via Facebook, her website, and on Twitter.

Last medically reviewed on September 19, 2018

Check out these marijuana-based products that are perfect for people who want the benefits of cannabis for their chronic pain, without having to smoke.

Coming soon: Pot chewing gum?

Maybe it just had to happen. This October, a cannabis-based chewing gum will hit marijuana dispensaries in Colorado, California, Arizona and Washington, D.C. This roll-out will follow on the heels of a dizzying array of home-made pot-based candies, baked goods, honeys, and elixirs – most of which are produced in the local areas where the cannabis shops conduct business. The gum, called Can Chew, is a collaboration of San Diego-based Medical Marijuana Inc., and Can Chew Technologies, a San Diego chewing gum technology company headquartered in the Netherlands.

Can Chew has developed a cannabis chewing gum containing Dronabinol, or THC, for people suffering from Alzheimer’s, appetite loss, multiple sclerosis and nausea. Through their technology, they are able to produce a gum that when chewed, releases fine particles of THC into the oral mucosa – the lining of the mouth – allowing for rapid absorption of the cannabis compound. According to the company, this allows for speedy relief from pain, nausea, tension and loss of appetite. According to Dr. Philip Van Damme of Can Chew, chronic pain sufferers, early and late-stage cancer patients and even anorexics can experience relief with the gum.

Cannabis has steadily emerged as a medicine for the treatment of nausea, glaucoma, pain, and a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, cannabis contains potent antioxidant compounds that demonstrate benefits in cases of cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, inflammation, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, HIV and dementia.

Medical Marijuana Inc., the first publicly held company (MJNA) devoted to cannabis, is positioning itself as the leading corporate innovator in the burgeoning cannabis product marketplace. The alliance with Can Chew is one of five strategic partnerships with entities in the cannabis medicine category. The company is also involved with cannabis cultivation, cannabis-based elixirs, cannabis dispensary retail stores, and additional cannabis medicines in other forms.

However, cannabis is illegal, and even in states where medical marijuana is state-approved, it flies in the face of federal laws regulating pot. Stepping around federal regulations with a mass-market, publicly traded product could prove very tricky. Also, cannabis is not suitable for everybody. Psychotic episodes have been reported among some cannabis users. And a recent study shows that adolescents who smoke pot and continue to do so throughout adulthood actually lose IQ points. So how do you keep Can Chew gum away from minors?

Over time, the public will have access to a broader array of cannabis-based products for various health needs. As with alcohol and prescription drugs, there are thorny issues to sort out about who should, and should not, be chewing pot gum. As local and state enforcement of anti-cannabis laws potentially continue to soften, more numbers of cannabis retail stores and more types of cannabis-based products will hit the U.S. market.

Can Chew is the first retail pot product that isn’t home-grown. Who knows what’s next after cannabis chewing gum. Could Cannabis Cola be far behind?

This October, a cannabis-based chewing gum will hit marijuana dispensaries in Colorado, California, Arizona and Washington, D.C. ]]>