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Banger’s Sport Shop

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Visitors to Banger’s Sport Shop greet archery and firearm experts during lessons and inside the expansive pro shop. Archery instructors drill students of all ages and experience levels in the basics of bow technique at a 10-yard indoor archery range, and ready them for practice on a half-mile, NFAA-certified field-archery course. On four outdoor shooting ranges of 25, 50, 100, and 300 yards long, NRA-certified firearms instructors teach aiming and shooting techniques during the introductory-shooting class. Back inside the shop, staffers fill guests in on an array of new and used firearms, compound bows, ammunition, reloading supplies, and hunting gear. An onsite gunsmith is also available to repair firearms or add vintage bicycle bells to ones needing more character.

Visitors to Banger's Sport Shop greet archery and firearm experts during lessons and inside the expansive pro shop. Archery instructors drill students of all ag

‘Racist’ gun range billboards in South Jersey should come down, activists say. The range’s owner disagrees.

A gun range in Camden County is resisting calls to take down two billboards that activists say aggravate racial tensions and mock NFL players who take a knee during the national anthem.

“It has absolutely nothing to do with race,” said Wesley Aducat, owner of the South Jersey Shooting Club in Winslow Township, which put up one of the billboards several weeks ago near Route 73 in Voorhees Township. The second appears on a digital sign near Routes 73 and 130 in Pennsauken. “It’s just support for our veterans.”

The signs say: “The only time we take a kneeā€¦” and show the silhouette of a person shooting a rifle, with the website of the club at the bottom.

Aducat said he supports the right to protest but doesn’t agree with kneeling during the anthem, particularly since many of the club’s members are veterans. He said he has no plans to remove the billboards.

That has upset the NAACP’s Camden County East chapter. It says the signs twist the message of kneeling, which is meant to bring attention to systemic racism and police brutality against people of color.

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“We’re talking about police murdering unarmed black people,” NAACP member Keith Benson Sr. said. He called the signs racially divisive and has encouraged people to call the club to complain. “They deserve all the disrespect they’re going to get as a result of putting it up. But they probably thought they were clever. They probably thought they were strong, patriotic Americans.”

South Jersey Women for Progressive Change, a group that formed after the 2016 presidential election to empower women, has also told its members to call the club. Susan Druckenbrod, one of the group’s members, said she recently talked to an employee: “I told them the billboard was offensive, and he said, ‘That’s nice,’ and he hung up.”

‘It has absolutely nothing to do with race,’ the owner of the South Jersey Shooting Club said.